Erupção na Islândia: prejuízo financeiro ou risco de vida?

O que é mais importante para os governantes europeus?

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Islândia: erupção Abril 2010A erupção do vulcão da Islândia intensificou-se ao final do dia desta segunda-feira, com uma nova nuvem de cinzas que se desloca para a Grã-Bretanha, revelaram esta noite as autoridades aéreas britânicas.
(…)
A retoma do tráfego faz-se sob pressão do sector da aviação, que criticou abertamente as restrições de voo, considerando-as excessivas. A Associação Internacional do Transporte Aéreo (IATA, no acrónimo em inglês) criticou a gestão da crise pelos governos da UE, estimando um custo para o sector de 150 milhões de euros diários.

(Nova nuvem de cinza ameaça Reino Unido, 20-04-2010, TVI 24)

On 8 June 1783, a fissure with 130 craters opened with phreatomagmatic explosions because of the groundwater interacting with the rising basalt magma. (…) This event is rated as VEI 6 on the Volcanic Explosivity Index, but the eight month emission of sulfuric aerosols resulted in one of the most important climatic and socially repercussive events of the last millennium.
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The eruption continued until 7 February 1784, but most of the lava was erupted in the first five months. Grímsvötn volcano, from which the Laki fissure extends, was also erupting at the time from 1783 until 1785. The outpouring of gases, including an estimated 8 million tons of hydrogen fluoride and estimated 120 million tons of sulfur dioxide, gave rise to what has since become known as the “Laki haze” across Europe.
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An estimated 120 million tons of sulfur dioxide were emitted, approximately equivalent to three times the total annual European industrial output in 2006, and also equivalent to a Mount Pinatubo-1991 eruption every three days. This outpouring of sulfur dioxide during unusual weather conditions caused a thick haze to spread across western Europe, resulting in many thousands of deaths throughout 1783 and the winter of 1784.
The summer of 1783 was the hottest on record and a rare high pressure zone over Iceland caused the winds to blow to the south-east. The poisonous cloud drifted to Bergen in Norway, then spread to Prague in the Province of Bohemia by 17 June, Berlin by 18 June, Paris by 20 June, Le Havre by 22 June, and to Great Britain by 23 June. The fog was so thick that boats stayed in port, unable to navigate, and the sun was described as “blood coloured”.
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An estimated 120 million tons of sulfur dioxide were emitted, approximately equivalent to three times the total annual European industrial output in 2006, and also equivalent to a Mount Pinatubo-1991 eruption every three days.[6] This outpouring of sulfur dioxide during unusual weather conditions caused a thick haze to spread across western Europe, resulting in many thousands of deaths throughout 1783 and the winter of 1784.
The summer of 1783 was the hottest on record[citation needed] and a rare high pressure zone over Iceland caused the winds to blow to the south-east. The poisonous cloud drifted to Bergen in Norway, then spread to Prague in the Province of Bohemia by 17 June, Berlin by 18 June, Paris by 20 June, Le Havre by 22 June, and to Great Britain by 23 June. The fog was so thick that boats stayed in port, unable to navigate, and the sun was described as “blood coloured”.

(Laki, Wikipedia)

Entesourastes, afinal, para os vossos últimos dias!
(Tiago 5, 3)

Porque a boca fala da abundância do coração.
(Mateus 12, 34)

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